Between karaoke, crime drama and shareholder meetings, it’s safe to say Yakuza is about so much more than just fighting. But you do punch a lotta blokes in those games.

Blown away by the newest title in Sony's lengthy handheld adventure series, we go inside Yakuza's 28-year history, how it played as a cultural phenomenon in Japan and why, given the recent financial crisis in the US, it's still a big part of popular Japanese entertainment history.

We...

The slaughter of innocent elephants at a Kenyan wildlife park and the killing of a Kenyan tourist in Tanzania during the annual clash of African cultures and wildlife caught the attention of U.S. President Donald Trump, who yesterday announced some of the first sanctions against foreign nationals and top politicians under his administration's newly created supply-side management policy.

The three men are Pakistani, Iranian and Iraqi nationals.

The bans will, the White House says, target "those engaged in serious human rights abuses."

"The deadly poaching of elephants and elephant ivory encourages anti-government extremists and corrupt officials to terrorize the people of Africa," Trump said in a written statement. "The illegal wildlife trade also destroys the local economies which support local communities. The decision to prohibit this indiscriminate slaughter is a first step towards ending the senseless slaughter of these magnificent animals."

He also decried the slaughter of the tourist, presumably to shock Kenyan villagers.

"The slaughter of such an innocent life is a grotesque affront to God and has nothing to do with traditions of African cultures," he wrote. "I will be urging the Kenyan government and everyone else to redouble their efforts to fight corruption and dangerous illegal wildlife trafficking."

The ostensible reason for the banning, according to an announcement by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, was that the three countries were involved in human trafficking.

"The Treasury Department opened an investigation in January 2017 into the potential trafficking of large quantities of elephant ivory and rhino horn in violation of U.S. law and regulations, announced U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Steve Mnuchin," it said.

The U.S. wants the bans to have priority under a new five-year visa ban on diplomats and others from the respective countries. The ban will last until May 2019, and is intended specifically to help repel terrorism.

"Unfortunately, as the NBC news story notes, this year has been caked with horrible news drawn from agencies across the globe from Myanmar's Rohingya riots to Venezuela's looming nationalization of its imports of food," the Treasury release said. "While it is unfortunate that some countries are prioritizing trading assets so
g