When stars in a galaxy stop forming, that galaxy will die. Astronomers, for the first time ever, have observed this phenomenon in a distant galaxy.

Astronomers have watched this distant that galaxy die, and can't quite believe it.

About "Strigos":

Astronomer, astronomer, Professor Franklin D. Watkins, PhD, after more than 25 years studying the M87 galaxy, has died at an Albuquerque, N.M. hospital. Watkins ended his research career as a professor of astronomy at California State University, Fullerton, where he taught courses in general relativity for 29 years at the Division III and Division IV level. An expert on phenomena such as cosmic mergers, interstellar dust, stellar clusters, and black holes, Dr. Watkins also was involved in many other high-profile studies, including a breakthrough telescopic study of Nearby galaxies in the early 1990s. , astronomer, Professor Franklin D. Watkins, PhD, after more than 25 years studying the M87 galaxy, has died at an Albuquerque, N.M. hospital. Watkins ended his research career as a professor of astronomy in California State University, Fullerton, where he taught courses in general relativity for 29 years at the Division III and Division IV level. An expert on phenomena such as cosmic mergers, interstellar dust, stellar clusters, and black holes, Dr. Watkins also was involved in many other high-profile studies, including a breakthrough telescopic study of Nearby galaxies in the early 1990s.

"Frank has created a great legacy for many of us by pioneering discussions of light/matter interactions that are to this day at the core of important astronomical observations," said Richard Hall, UC Press Professor of Astronomy and Christopher Cox Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Astronomy at California State University, Fullerton, where Dr. Watkins was the Chair for 26 years.

"Frank has made the brightest universe map of any astronomer of his time. His maps are the basis for discussions on distant objects like homogeneous stellar clusters; giant galaxies like M87 and M83, which have not been observed nearby this century; and black holes," said David Willey, Professor and director of the George L. Blake Observatory, which receives most of its data from Dr. Watkins' M87 project.

"He was truly an exceptional mosaic of talent, ability, passion and compassion. Above all else it was his habit of being there when we needed him, capable of sitting with us through storms of sorrow, testing our poetry, and helping us to see light through matter in a way that has been essential for the professional success of this star-studded research
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