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WASHINGTON — Senate Republicans on Tuesday announced another $60.4 billion in amendments to the $1.15 trillion tax bill, using a procedural move known as the "vote-a-rama" to resubmit more than 50 of the most controversial, potentially controversial and potentially counter-productive provisions for further debate.

They continued to keep trying for an amendment that would roll back — short of immediately eliminating — a special tax break for coal and natural-gas drillers, or a proposal not to let pass a sunset in some hedge funds tax advantage of seven years or more. One of the few "unanimous consent" requests — obtained by The Associated Press — passed overwhelmingly, 159 to 63, to move on to the clear majority of votes needed for passage.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, refused to allow an unlimited balancing hike in the personal-health-insurance disclosure provision. Republicans were cautioned by their conference Tuesday that a 42-word amendment demanding that the House Senate bill be changed was likely to fail anyway, since Democrats in that chamber already have made clear they have no interest in such an amendment.

The move for the "vote-a-rama" provided Senate Republicans with a way to make the longtime priority infrastructure reforms more palatable for GOP holdouts on electoral, financial pasts and pragmatic concerns. Republican senators sought unusually swift agreement on priorities for the tax legislation, with a committed and united team of 22 in a room in the White House complex Tuesday night.

At Tuesday night's meeting, party leaders went outside the conference on several areas, including coal.

Kenneth Johnson, a Federal Highway Administration administrator under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, predicted that
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